Hydrate all day long


Healthy Lifestyles Corner

Greene County News



XENIA — Runners: pay attention to what and how much you’re drinking. It can’t be emphasized enough. Drink enough water before, during and after any form of exercise. Not properly hydrated? Skimping on water can lead to fatigue and muscle cramping.

Bottom line on proper hydration

On runs of an hour or more, carry water with you and consume 6-8 oz. every 20 minutes. During pre-training and 5K, 10K or Marathon training, weigh yourself before and after each run and get your body weight back to the weight it was before the run by drinking water or sports drink within the first hours after the run. If you’re doing a long run or race (more than 8 to 10 miles), make sure you’re well-hydrated during the few days leading up to your long run. Avoid cocktails for at least one week before your race. Alcohol dehydrates you and disrupts a good night’s sleep, something every runner needs before race day. Running with a hangover? Not a good idea. You’ll start your run dehydrated.

How To Start

An hour before your run, drink 16-24 ounces of water or other non-caffeinated, sugar-free fluid Stop drinking at that point or you’ll find yourself waiting in long lines for the Port-O-Potty, a surefire way to kill your time Drink another 4 to 8 ounces right before you start to make sure you’re hydrated before your run

Drinking on the run

During your runs, take in 4-6 ounces of water every 20 minutes • During longer workouts (90 minutes or more), drink a sports drink to replace lost sodium and other minerals (electrolytes)

If you don’t have access to water on your running routes, you’ll have to carry your own fluids with you. Here are some handy water bottles that you can use while you run:

The Ultimate Direction FastDraw Extreme is one of the most popular hand-helds. It’ll keep your fluids cold, no matter what the temperature is outside. The neoprene band that wraps around the bottle prevents you from warming up the liquid inside, while protecting your hands from getting ice cold. The bottle also features a zipper stash compartment that can hold keys, cash or gel. www.ultimatedirection.com

The Fuel Belt holds four, dishwasher-safe 8 oz. bottles. A good idea is to fill three with water and one with a sports drink. A detachable race pocket holds sports gels, money, keys, or anything else that you might need for a long run or race. The Fuel Belt is comfortable and not too heavy. It’s a must-have for long distance runs. www.fuelbelt.com

Post-run hydration

Rehydrate with water or a sports drink after your run • If your urine is dark yellow after your run, you need to keep rehydrating. Drink until it’s a pale yellow color.

Cold or warm?

Rumor has it that you can get cramps from drinking cold water before running. This is a myth. Cold water is actually absorbed in the body quicker than warm water. Drinking water, whether it’s warm or cold, before or during running should not give you cramps. The best ways to prevent side stitches while running is to make sure you warm-up properly and to breathe deeply through your mouth.

This Week’s 5K Training Tip — Two weeks from race day:

You’re now two weeks from Race Day for the annual Spring Has Sprung Healthy Families 5K Run/Walk on April 1. During this week of training, your endurance and strength should be such that you can jog continuously for about 2 1⁄2 – 3 miles. On your chosen training days (3-5 days are recommended), always start with a brisk five- minute warm-up walk, then: Day 1: Jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes); Day 2: Jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes); Day 3: Jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes).

To register for the April 1 Spring Has Sprung Healthy Families 5K Run/Walk at the Xenia YMCA go to www.speedy-feet.com or print and mail a registration form with your payment by visiting www.gcph.info. For more information or to sponsor this event call 937-374-5683 or email jdrew@gcph.info.

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Healthy Lifestyles Corner

Greene County News

Story courtesy of Greene County Public Health, adapted from www.runnersworld.com.

Story courtesy of Greene County Public Health, adapted from www.runnersworld.com.