Cleaning up the Mound


Greene County News



Submitted photos Active conservationist Hope Taft of Spring Valley works to remove invasive plants growing from the gorge stone walls while GCP&T Director Chrisbell Bednar follows with loppers and spray for the stumps of honeysuckle.


GCP&T Grounds Supervisor uses a chain saw to remove the larger honeysuckle bushes.


CEDARVILLE — A lot of good people came together Saturday to fight a lot of bad plants during an invasive plant blitz at Greene County Parks and Trails’ Indian Mound Reserve.

Approximately 100 people from the Cincinnati Wildflower Preservation Society, Beavercreek Wetlands Association, Ohio Nature Conservancy, Horticulture Management Inc. and Greene County Parks & Trails (GCP&T) as well as community volunteers worked together Saturday to eradicate honey suckle, autumn olive and other invasive plants from the 166-acre park, which is home to the Pollock Works, Williamson Mound, Massie Creek Gorge, wetlands, Cedar Cliff Falls and a log cabin.

Approximately 100 species of wildflowers, including the rare now trillium, thrive in the park.

Volunteers arrived from all over the state to help with the effort. The overgrowth of invasive plants threatens the required growing conditions for the native wild species to thrive. The event phase one of a three-year process and will be held again in the Autumn of 2018 and 2019.

For more information on GCP&T’s Indian Mound Reserve or the park agency’s invasive plant eradication efforts, call 937-562-6440 or email info@gcparkstrails.com.

Submitted photos Active conservationist Hope Taft of Spring Valley works to remove invasive plants growing from the gorge stone walls while GCP&T Director Chrisbell Bednar follows with loppers and spray for the stumps of honeysuckle.
http://www.xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/32/2017/11/web1_DSCN5426.jpgSubmitted photos Active conservationist Hope Taft of Spring Valley works to remove invasive plants growing from the gorge stone walls while GCP&T Director Chrisbell Bednar follows with loppers and spray for the stumps of honeysuckle.

GCP&T Grounds Supervisor uses a chain saw to remove the larger honeysuckle bushes.
http://www.xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/32/2017/11/web1_DSCN5418.jpgGCP&T Grounds Supervisor uses a chain saw to remove the larger honeysuckle bushes.

Greene County News

Story courtesy of Greene County Parks and Trails.

Story courtesy of Greene County Parks and Trails.