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Last updated: March 29. 2014 12:40AM - 781 Views

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Bill should be rejected


Community leaders in Columbus recently urged state senators and Gov. John Kasich to reject a dangerous, unnecessary bill that would exponentially expand the circumstances in which a person has no duty to retreat before using lethal force. They were joined by Lucia McBath, whose unarmed son Jordan Davis, 17, was shot and killed at a Florida gas station after a dispute over loud music.


House Bill 203, Ohio’s version of “stand your ground” legislation, has cleared the House. Now before the Ohio Senate, this bill should not reach Mr. Kasich’s desk.


The measure would almost surely encourage gun violence — something Ohio and its cities don’t need — and lead to more needless deaths. Nor would the bill strengthen legitimate rights to self-defense.


Ohio law already states that people need not retreat in their residence or vehicle, or the vehicle of an immediate family member. Those provisions are ample, including areas of personal domain to which US legal tradition and the “castle doctrine” have extended special protections. Among other things, the House bill would extend immunities to anywhere a person has a legal right to be — an invitation to violence and vigilantism …


Existing laws protect the personal space that society generally considers inviolable. Extending those protections to virtually anywhere just invites violence. — The Tolede Blade


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Religious liberty and health insurance


Hobby Lobby is the kind of business President Barack Obama says he loves. The family-owned company is successful, and its owners treat their employees like family. They receive better pay and benefits than many others in retail jobs, including wages well above the federal minimum.


But through Obamacare, the Health and Human Services Department is requiring all businesses provide a wide range of contraceptives free of charge to employees through their insurance plans. Part of that requirement goes against the religious beliefs of the family who owns Hobby Lobby, and they’ve brought a lawsuit against the Obama administration.


The company was founded by David Green in a garage in 1972. The family business has grown into more than 556 stores in 41 states with 16,000 full-time employees. Hobby Lobby pays its hourly employees 90 percent above the federal minimum wage and offers them generous insurance and retirement plans for a retail chain.


(Tuesday), the U.S. Supreme Court (heard) oral arguments in the Hobby Lobby case. This case was combined with a similar one out of Pennsylvania. The Greens are represented by the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, a nonprofit legal and educational institute.


The contraceptive mandate has created an uproar throughout the Catholic Church and beyond to the private sector. So far, 94 cases have been filed challenging the mandate — half are from for-profit companies like Hobby Lobby. The rest are from nonprofits. Eleven of the lawsuits are out of Michigan.


And the Hobby Lobby owners do offer birth control to employees in their insurance plans. It’s the drugs and devices that may induce an early abortion that they object to — only four out of 20 contraceptives the Obama administration wants employers to include.


Lori Windham, a Becket Fund attorney who is representing Hobby Lobby, says the law is on the side of Hobby Lobby. For instance, in a decision last June, the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the religious rights of the Greens. Many of the other businesses and organizations challenging the mandate have had similar favorable rulings.


“We are hopeful,” Windham says. If the Green family doesn’t win, Windham says this will set a “very disturbing and troubling precedent” that if you open a family business you forfeit your religious rights. And with that precedent, there would be few limits as to what the government could tell companies to do.


In a country that was founded on protecting basic, individual freedoms, that would be a significant setback — not to mention an affront to the Constitution …


Churches are exempt from the mandate, but the administration didn’t rule out religiously affiliated hospitals, charities and colleges …


The Supreme Court should uphold the ability of people like the Greens to run a business without violating their conscience. — The Detroit News


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