Last updated: May 19. 2014 11:17PM - 575 Views
By Dan Gelston AP Sports Writer



Pole-sitter Ed Carpenter laughs as he watches Dario Franchitti squeal the tires on the pace car as he pulled onto the track before the start of Monday's practice for the Indianapolis 500 IndyCar auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
Pole-sitter Ed Carpenter laughs as he watches Dario Franchitti squeal the tires on the pace car as he pulled onto the track before the start of Monday's practice for the Indianapolis 500 IndyCar auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Ed Carpenter has turned Indianapolis Motor Speedway into quite the home track advantage.


Carpenter graduated from Butler, roots for the Indiana Pacers, and has an unabashed love for “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” But the stepson of IndyCar founder Tony George is leaving his own imprint on the Indy sports scene each May.


Carpenter took back-to-back pole victories, posting a four-lap average of 231.067 mph Sunday to take the top spot in the 500 for the second straight year.


“I felt that it was harder,” Carpenter said. “It was just a different position because when I made my run last year, we didn’t really have anything to lose. This year, being the last guy to go out, I think there was a little bit of pressure to not mess it up.”


Carpenter’s No. 20 Chevrolet was the car to beat all weekend, and the hometown favorite showed no signs of rust in his first IndyCar Series race of the season. He owns Ed Carpenter Racing and decided in November to run only on ovals, where he excels. He turned his car over to Mike Conway on road and street courses, and skipped the first four races of the season.


In an event steeped in tradition, Carpenter added his own by becoming the 11th driver to win consecutive poles.


“The month of May is fun,” he said. “I wouldn’t want to rush through and miss the parade, drivers meeting, and autograph sessions.”


Carpenter was the last of nine qualifiers to hit the track and bumped James Hinchcliffe from the top spot. Hinchcliffe will start second after sustaining a concussion last weekend in the Grand Prix of Indianapolis. Will Power will join them on the front row.


Three-time Indy 500 champion Helio Castroneves was fourth, followed by Simon Pagenaud and Marco Andretti. Carlos Munoz, Josef Newgarden and J.R. Hildebrand will be on the third row.


Carpenter was 10th in last year’s Indy 500.


“It’s all about the race,” the 33-year-old Carpenter said. “Hopefully, we can close the deal this year.”


BUSCH’S DOUBLE GETS DIFFICULT: NASCAR Sprint Cup regular Kurt Busch crashed hard into the outside wall at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Tuesday as his No. 26 car went through the second turn during practice for Sunday’s Indianapolis 500. Debris flew into the air and one of the tires rolled down the track as the car rolled to a stop on the infield grass.


Busch was checked at the infield medical center and cleared to drive.


He is attempting to become the fourth driver to complete the Indy 500 and NASCAR’s Coca-Cola 600 on the same day. He will start 12th for the 500 if the car can be repaired, the same spot from where Tony Kanaan started and won last year’s race. If Andretti Autosport uses a different car, Busch would start from the back of the 33-car field.


MONTOYA’S MARK: Juan Pablo Montoya was a day late with his fastest average of the weekend. But the 2000 Indy 500 winner proved he has enough speed to contend again for a second victory on the bricks. Montoya was the fastest of the non-pole qualifiers and his 231.007 was topped only by pole winner Carpenter. Montoya, who spent the last seven seasons in NASCAR, was faster than his Penske teammates Power and three-time Indy 500 winner Castroneves. Power, however, is on the front row and Castroneves is fourth.


GANASSI REBOUND: Team owner Chip Ganassi had $1 million reasons to smile Sunday and that was before his drivers rebounded from disappointing qualifying runs on Saturday. Ganassi driver Jamie McMurray won the $1 million prize Saturday night at Charlotte Motor Speedway in NASCAR’s All-Star race. Back in Indy, reigning series champion Scott Dixon had the second-fastest average of non-pole qualifiers and will start 10th. Kanaan, last year’s champ, starts 16th. Charlie Kimball starts 26th and Ryan Briscoe 30th.


CHAMPS ARE HERE: There are six former Indianapolis 500 winners in the starting field: Kanaan (2013), Castroneves (2001, 2002, 2009), Scott Dixon (2008), Montoya (2000), Buddy Lazier (1996) and Jacques Villeneuve (1995). They have a combined eight 500 victories. The record for most former winners in the field is 10, in 1992.

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