WSU offers new business management certifications


Staff report



FAIRBORN — The Wright State Raj Soin College of Business is offering certificates in both management and human resources management for current bachelor’s degree holders.

The university rolled out the two certificate programs during the fall semester. Each is designed to provide access to both fundamental and advanced managerial skills for people who may not have the time or the inclination to pursue a master’s degree. However, the four classes required for the certificates can be counted towards the 11 courses required for a Master of Business Administration, should a student choose to pursue that.

Courses required for the management certificate include leadership and ethics, organizational development and two other management classes. Students can take the required courses for each of the two certificate programs online.

David Bright, professor and chair of the Department of Management and International Business, said the management certificate is especially valuable for people who find themselves in managerial positions without a lot of training.

“It is also very good for people who just want to develop essential leadership skills,” said Bright. “A student who completes this certificate will have a greater degree of the competencies that are needed to be an effective administrator and leader.”

Bright said the program enhances opportunities for advancement and increased salaries by providing advanced skills in team management, performance management, project planning and execution.

“Our program includes content that incorporates the latest discoveries from social science and helps students really be prepared as managers and inspirational leaders,” he said.

The human resources management certificate offers courses on staffing, compensation and benefits, training and development, and leadership and ethics.

“HR as a career has a well-developed professional skill set,” said Bright. “This is a good credential for starting an HR career or advancing your knowledge if you are already into an HR career.”

Bright said one HR certificate student earned her bachelor’s degree 10 years ago, has worked full time for many years since, and is interested in moving into an HR career as her company has evolved.

“It seems to be a very common story,” he said.

The program provides in-depth information in several HR function areas, something not offered by many other programs. In addition, an extra course is available to certificate seekers who are switching careers and are in need of practical experience.

The demand for HR professionals in the United States is forecast to grow by 7% through 2029.

“For the HR program, we have expertise that is equal to any in our local region for sure,” said Bright. “You learn from professors who know the field and know it really, really well.”

Staff report